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[1 of 21] Jesus (c. 4 BC - AD 30, Israel): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "Gospel of Thomas"
Become passers-by.

[2 of 21] Keeney, Bradford (b. 1951-, USA): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
Kalahari spirituality suggests that it is distracting and inaccurate to depict yourself as a person who should try to spiritually evolve. If you are in tune, life simply plays beautiful music on you. It has nothing to do with your instrument being more developed; it is all about tuning. The key to embracing vital living is to know how to tune your life. And stay tuned. …
 The whole of life is already tuned, and the gods are never out of tune. What they await is your being in tune with them so their wisdom and expression can be sympathetically transmitted through you. You are the violin at the back of the room. Get in tune, and life will play you beautifully and perfectly.

[3 of 21] Leseur, Elisabeth (1866-1914, France): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
Not to accept everything, but to understand everything; not to approve of everything, but to forgive everything; not to adopt everything, but to search for the grain of truth that is contained in everything.

[4 of 21] Meher Baba (1894-1969, India): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
For the purification of your heart, leave your thoughts alone, but maintain a constant vigil over your actions. When you have thoughts of anger, lust or greed, do not worry about them, and do not try to check them. Let all such thoughts come and go without putting them into action.
 Try to think counter-thoughts in order to discern, to discriminate, to learn, and above all to unlearn the actions which are prompted by your own impressions.
 It is better to feel angry sometimes than merely to suppress anger. You then have an opportunity to think about anger, its causes and its consequences. Although your mind may be angry, do not let your heart know it. Remain unaffected. If you never feel angry you will be like stone, in which form the mind is least developed. Similarly, if you never have lusty thoughts you cannot achieve the merit of having avoided lustful actions.
 Let the thoughts of anger, lust and greed come and go freely and unasked without putting them into words and deeds. Then the related impressions in your mind begin to wear out and become less and less harmful. But when you put such thoughts into action, whether overtly or secretly, you develop new impressions worse than those which are spent in the act. These new impressions root even more firmly in your mind.
 The fire of divine love alone can destroy all impressions once and for all.


[5 of 21] Meister Eckhart (1260-1328, Germany): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "From Sermons no. 20"
A godly man has to close his heart and outward senses to external things and his inward senses to all mortal cares. He must turn his whole attention into himself. He must be still and listen to what God is saying in him. He must hoist himself up above himself. He has got to be a mirror of divine ideas, to fill his soul with divine forms. He must see the light in the light, foster the light in the light, become the light in the light. He must have in the world no more than his body. He must begin to explore eternity, must always be breaking fresh ground, always cultivating some new perception.

[6 of 21] Plotinus (c. 204-270, Egypt): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Philosophy of Plotinus: Gifford Lectures 1917-1918, vol.2": detail "From ‘Enneads’ 1.6.9"
Retire into yourself and examine yourself. If you do not yet find beauty there, do like the sculptor who chisels, planes, polishes, till he has adorned his statue with all the attributes of beauty. So do you chisel away from your Soul what is superfluous, straighten that which is crooked, purify and enlighten what is dark, and do not cease working at your statue, until virtue shines before your eyes with its divine splendor, and you see temperance seated in your bosom with its holy purity.
 When you know that you have become this perfect work, when you are self-gathered in the purity of your being, nothing now remaining that can shatter that inner unity, nothing from without clinging to the authentic man, when you find yourself wholly true to your essential nature, wholly that only veritable Light which is not measured by space, not narrowed to any circumscribed form nor again diffused as a thing void of term, but ever unmeasurable as something greater than all measure and more than all quantity—when you perceive that you have grown to this, you are now become very vision: now call up all your confidence, strike forward yet a step—you need a guide no longer—strain, and see.
 This is the only eye that sees the mighty Beauty.


[7 of 21] Rogers, Will (1879-1935, USA): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
Lead your life so you wouldn’t be ashamed to sell the family parrot to the town gossip.

[8 of 21] Scupoli, Lorenzo (1530-1610, Italy): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
In acquiring virtue do not follow the example of those who, in the course of the seven days of the week, arrange their spiritual works in such a way that one should serve one virtue, another—another virtue, and so on, without taking into consideration whether they stand in need of this or that at the actual moment. No, do not act thus, but take up arms pre-eminently against the passion which troubles you most, which has often conquered you and which is ready to attack you again now. Fight it with your whole strength and strive to establish yourself in the virtue opposed to that passion, using for this purpose all suitable practices and tasks. For as soon as you succeed in this, you will, by this very fact, bring to life all other virtues in yourself and will be clothed in them as in armor, which will then protect you from all the arrows of passions. By nature our heart is full of good dispositions; but passions come and stifle them. These passions are not of equal strength in every man, but in one man one passion predominates, in another another passion rules over the rest. As soon as you banish the chief passion, all the others grow weaker and recede by themselves. When this comes to pass, the good dispositions, freed from their yoke, acquire in you the strength natural to them and, standing at the door of your heart, are always ready to serve you, whenever it is required.

[9 of 21] St. Peter of Damaskos (12th century, Syria): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "From ‘Treasury of Divine Knowledge’"
Do not to fight against all the passions at once, since if we are unsuccessful we might turn back and no longer be fit for the kingdom of heaven. Rather we should fight the passions one at a time, and start by patiently enduring whatever befalls us.

[10 of 21] Seneca (4 BC - AD 65, Spain): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Letters from a Stoic": detail "‘Letters’ XXXV"
Try to perfect yourself, if for no other reason, in order that you may learn how to love.

[11 of 21] St. Catherine of Genoa (1447-1510, Italy): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Mystical Element of Religion"
Ever fight self, and you need not trouble about any other foe.

[12 of 21] St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380, Italy): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "‘Letter T21’, Feb 1376"
Say to yourself: “My soul, put up today with this little bit of suffering. Resist, and don’t give in. Tomorrow perhaps your life will come to an end, and even if you’re still alive you’ll do what God will have you do; do the same today.” I tell you, if you act in this way your soul and your body, which are now turned into a stable, will become a temple where God will find his delight, dwelling within you by grace.

[13 of 21] St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380, Italy): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Life of Catherine of Sienna": detail "From Part2,ch.4"
In favorable events or in contradictions, say always, 'I must reap something from this;' were you to act thus, you would very soon be rich.

[14 of 21] St. Hesychius (5th century, Israel): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
He who struggles inwardly must practice at every moment these four (doings): humility, extreme attention, resistance (to thoughts) and prayer. Humility, so that, since this struggle is against proud demons, a man may have the help of Christ always in the hand of his heart; for the Lord abominates the proud. Attention, that he may allow his heart to entertain no thought, even though it seems good. Resistance, so that, distinguishing clearly who it is that comes to him, he may at once with anger contradict the wicked one. And prayer, that after resistance he may immediately cry from the depths of his heart to Christ, with groaning that cannot be uttered.

[15 of 21] St. Philotheos of Sinai (9th - 10th centuries, Egypt): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
Every day we should keep ourselves as though we were to appear before God.

[16 of 21] St. Thalassios the Libyan (c. late 6th - 7th century, Libya): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "From 'Second Century on Love, et al'"
If you want to be freed from all the vices simultaneously, renounce self-love, the mother of evils.

[17 of 21] Suso, Heinrich (1295-1365, Switzerland): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Little Book of Eternal Wisdom": detail "From ch. 9"
 The Servant.—Gentle Lord, teach me how in my imperfection I ought to behave myself in this matter.
 Eternal Wisdom.—You ought in good days to look at evil ones, and in evil days not to forget good days; thus can neither elation injure you in my company, nor despondency in dereliction. If in your faintheartedness you cannot endure my absence with pleasure, at least wait for me with patience and seek me diligently.

[18 of 21] Thurman, Robert (b. 1941-, USA): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)"
In mind reform, you let the enemy have the victory. Let him win, let him have it. You take the defeat yourself. If someone abuses you, you take the benefit of the abuse by building your tolerance and patience, and do not think of retaliating. In the commitment to be critical of your own delusions, you go after your own faults and biases. If someone harms you, you do not hold this in mind and wait for an opportunity to take revenge. Instead, strengthen your patience and find ways to forgive the harm done to you.

[19 of 21] Anonymous (3000 BC-current, World): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": detail "‘Sentences of Sextus’’"
Possess those things that no one can take away from you.

[20 of 21] St. John of the Cross (1542-1591, Spain): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Cosmic Consciousness": detail "From 'Ascent of Mount Carmel'"
On this road, therefore, to abandon one's own way is to enter on the true way, or, to speak more correctly, to pass onwards to the goal; and to forsake one's own way is to enter on that which has none, namely, God. For the soul that attains to this state has no ways or methods of its own, neither does it nor can it lean upon anything of the kind. I mean ways of understanding, perceiving, or feeling, though it has all ways at the same time, as one who possessing nothing, yet possesses everything. For the soul courageously resolved on passing, interiorly and exteriorly, beyond the limits of its own nature, enters illimitably within the supernatural, which has no measure, but contains all measure imminently within itself. To arrive there is to depart hence, going away, out of oneself, as far as possible from this vile state to that which is the highest of all. Therefore, rising above all that may be known and understood, temporally and spiritually, the soul must earnestly desire to reach that which in this life cannot be known, and which the heart cannot conceive; and, leaving behind all actual and possible taste and feeling of sense and spirit, must desire earnestly to arrive at that which transcends all sense and all feeling. In order that the soul may be free and unembarrassed for this end it must in no wise attach itself to anything it may receive in the sense or spirit, but esteem such as of much less importance. For the more importance the soul attributes to what it understands, feels and imagines, and the greater the estimation it holds it in, whether it be spiritual or not, the more it detracts from the supreme good, and the greater will be its delay in attaining to it. On the other hand, the less that it esteems all that it may have in comparison with the supreme good, the more does it magnify and esteem the supreme good, and consequently the greater the progress towards it. In this way the soul draws nearer and nearer to the divine union, in darkness, by the way of faith, which, though it be also obscure, yet sends forth a marvelous light. Certainly, if the soul will see, it thereby becomes instantly more blind as to God, than he who should attempt to gaze upon the sun shining in its strength. On this road, therefore, to have our own faculties in darkness is to see the light.

[21 of 21] Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180, Italy): primary subject "Work, summary/overview" (search under Outer Life/Religions, Ways)": source "Thoughts of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius": detail "Chapter II.17"
Of human life the time is a point, and the substance is in a flux, and the perception dull, and the composition of the whole body subject to putrefaction, and the soul a whirl, and fortune hard to divine, and fame a thing devoid of judgment. And, to say all in a word, everything which belongs to the body is a stream, and what belongs to the soul is a dream and vapor, and life is a warfare and a stranger’s sojourn, and after-fame is oblivion. What then is that which is able to conduct a man? One thing and only one, philosophy. But this consists in keeping the daemon [spirit] within a man free from violence and unharmed, superior to pains and pleasures, doing nothing without a purpose, nor yet falsely and with hypocrisy, not feeling the need of another man’s doing or not doing anything; and besides, accepting all that happens, and all that is allotted, as coming from thence, wherever it is, from whence he himself came; and, finally, waiting for death with a cheerful mind, as being nothing else than a dissolution of the elements of which every living being is compounded. But if there is no harm to the elements themselves in each continually changing into another, why should a man have any apprehension about the change and dissolution of all the elements? For it is according to nature, and nothing is evil which is according to nature.