Extracts

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Innocence

swedenborg

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[1 of 3] Swedenborg (1688-1772, Sweden): primary subject "Innocence" (search under Inner Life/Teachings)": source "Conjugial Love": detail "Section 414"
On the subject of innocence I have often conversed with the angels who have told me that innocence is the esse (being) of every good, and that good is only so far good as it has innocence in it: and, since wisdom is of life and thence of good, that wisdom is only so far wisdom as it partakes of innocence: the like is true of love, charity, and faith; and hence it is that no one can enter heaven unless he has innocence.

[2 of 3] Swedenborg (1688-1772, Sweden): primary subject "Innocence" (search under Inner Life/Teachings)": source "Conjugial Love": detail "Section 394"
Innocence and peace are the two inmost principles of heaven; they are called inmost principles, because they proceed immediately from the Lord: for the Lord is innocence itself and peace itself. A further reason why innocence and peace are the inmost principles of heaven, is because innocence is the esse (being) of every good, and peace is the blessed principle of every delight which is of good.

[3 of 3] Swedenborg (1688-1772, Sweden): primary subject "Innocence" (search under Inner Life/Teachings)": source "Arcana Coelestia, vol.8": detail "Section 6107"
Innocence is that from the Inmost which qualifies all the good of charity and of love. For the Lord flows in through innocence into charity, and in proportion to the innocence, such is the reception of charity; for innocence is the very essential of charity. The nature of innocence may be seen as in a mirror from little children, in that they love their parents and trust in them alone, having no care but to please them; and accordingly they have food and clothing not merely for their needs, but also for their delight; and as they love their parents, they do with the delight of affection whatever is agreeable to them, thus not only what they command, but also what they suppose them to wish to command, and, moreover, have no self-regard whatever; not to mention many other characteristics of infancy. But be it known that the innocence of little children is not innocence, but only its semblance. Real innocence dwells solely in wisdom, and wisdom consists in bearing one's self towards the Lord, from the good of love and of faith, as do little children towards their parents in the way just stated.