Extracts

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Life

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[1 of 2] Swedenborg (1688-1772, Sweden): primary subject "Life, as love and wisdom" (search under Inner Life/Love, Positive Emotion, Virtue, Will)": source "Arcana Coelestia, vol.6": detail "Section 4417"
No one has any thing of life from himself, but from the Lord, although he may seem to live from himself. Life is to understand and to will; and as all understanding has relation to truth, and all willing to good, then life is the understanding of truth and the will of good.

[2 of 2] Swedenborg (1688-1772, Sweden): primary subject "Life, as love and wisdom" (search under Inner Life/Love, Positive Emotion, Virtue, Will)": source "Divine Love and Wisdom": detail "Section 363"
Love and wisdom, and therefore the will and the understanding, make the very life of man; but scarcely any one knows what life is. When a man thinks about life, it appears to be a floating somewhat without an idea attached to it. This is because it is not known that God alone is life, and that His life is divine love and divine wisdom. Hence it is plain that life with man is nothing else than this, and that in the degree in which he receives, life is with him. We know that heat and light proceed from the sun, and that all things in the universe are recipients, and that things grow warm and bright in the degree in which they receive. So also heat and light proceed from the spiritual sun where the Lord is, and the proceeding heat is love, and the proceeding light is wisdom. Out of these two things, therefore, which proceed from the Lord as a sun, life is. That love and wisdom from the Lord is life, may also appear from this, that man becomes torpid as love recedes from him, and becomes stupid as wisdom recedes from him, and if they receded altogether he would be extinct.
 There are several departments of love that have obtained other names because they are derivations; such as affections, desires, appetites, and their pleasures and delights: and there are several departments of wisdom, as perception, reflection, recollection, thought, intention for an object: and there are several common to both love and wisdom, as consent, conclusion and determination to action, besides others: all these indeed are of both, but they are denominated from the more prevalent and immediate element of the two. From these two ultimately the sensations are derived; namely, of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch, with their delights and pleasures.
 It is of appearance that the eye sees; but the understanding sees through the eye; hence seeing is also predicated of the understanding. The appearance is that the ear hears; but the understanding hears through the ear; hence also hearing is predicated of attention and listening which are acts of the understanding. The appearance is that the nostrils smell, and that the tongue tastes; but the understanding smells, and also tastes, by virtue of its perception; and therefore also smelling and tasting are predicated of perception. And so in other cases. The sources of all these, both the former and the latter, are love and wisdom: from which it may appear that these two make the life of man.